Alexandria Gazette – March 8, 1867 – Andrew Johnson Impeachment

THE IMPEACHMENT subject was discussed, at length, in the House of Representatives, yesterday, on a resolution to pay on the order of the Judiciary Committee such sums of money as may enable the Committee to prosecute the investigation of the charges against the President on which to ground his Impeachment. The resolution was adopted – so the “investigation” is to go on. Mr. Butler, of Massachusetts, concluded his speech with this sentence: “I say that if any man stands in the way of the great march of this country to honor, to glory, to peace, to unity, to happiness, to liberty, and to law, he must be taken out of the way by a constitutional method.” The reader will translate this into plain English, readily, as Mr. Brooks remarked in reply. Mr. Brooks, Mr. Fernando Wood, Mr. Pruyn, and, others deprecated the continued agitation of this subject – declared that there was nothing for which the President could be impeached – and that the best interests of the country were satisfied by such a political movement. Mr. Pruyn remarked: – “The gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. Butler] said that the President stood in the way of “progress;” not that he had neglected his duty; not that he had violated the Constitution of his oath of office, but he stood in the way of progress, as that gentleman understands it. My understanding of it is not progress in constitutional liberty, but progress in despotism.” We have only now to wait and see what is to come next.

THE FOLLOWING STORY IS NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO JOHNSON’S IMPEACHMENT, BUT RECONSTRUCTION IS PART OF WHAT IS GOING ON DURING THIS PERIOD IN US HISTORY. IT IMMEDIATELY PROCEEDED THE ABOVE STORY.


MORE REQUIREMENTS. – Mr. Sumner’s joint resolutions requiring further guarantees for “reconstruction” in the South, provide, in addition to universal suffrage, without distinction of color, that the existing governments must be vacated and take no part in the reconstruction; that provisional governments must supersede the present illegal governments; that none but loyal persons shall take part in the formation of new State governments; that public schools must be established, open to all, and that homesteads must be secured to freedmen. Mr. Wilson’s bill, also exacting additional guarantees, provides for a registration, requires an oath of allegiance before registration as a voter, and arranges for State Conventions to be called by the military officers in command in the South.

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